Pro Tools
•Register a festival or a film
Submit film to festivals Promote for free or with Promo Packages

FILMFESTIVALS | 24/7 world wide coverage

Welcome !

Enjoy the best of both worlds: Film & Festival News, exploring the best of the film festivals community.  

Launched in 1995, relentlessly connecting films to festivals, documenting and promoting festivals worldwide.

A brand new website will soon be available. Covid-19 is not helping, stay safe meanwhile.

For collaboration, editorial contributions, or publicity, please send us an email here

User login

|FRENCH VERSION|

RSS Feeds 

Martin Scorsese Masterclass in Cannes

 

 

Presenting the website

 

tinseltine


TINSEL & TINE

Tinsel & Tine (Reel & Dine) is about discovering what I find pleasing in Film & Food -  My post/commentary are from the perspective of someone who truly reveres good storytelling, and possesses a voracious appetite.

Although I also write about my dining experiences and food events, the blog is primarily film-centric. My writing style weaves together personal anecdotes and observations in conjunction with film reviews, reporting from film festivals and preview film screenings. Not to mention, whenever possible, highlighting the simpatico of food in film!

Tinsel & Tine encourages blog contributors. Please send
your film festival experiences - from big and small film festivals - pictures, short reviews, long reviews, food & film tie-ins, report on the celebrities, the atmosphere etc... Feel free to share your festival coverage during or after the festival.  (Blogging credit only compensation).

 


feed

Darren Aronfosky Q & A and Day Two of Philly Film Fest

To view with images read post on Tinsel & Tine

I made it to The Philadelphia Film Festival “Making Film in Philly” Panel Discussion (Four Points by Sheraton), in time to enjoy coffee and TastyKakes.  The panel was amazing!  Bob Lowerly & Andy Williams- Dive Shooter (Visual effects and Post Production), Justin Weinberg, Entertainment Lawyer, Thomas Ashley, President of Philadelphia Soundstage,  Wendy Cox Hollywood Production Manager, Sharon Pinkenson, Executive Director of Greater Philadelphia Film Office.

These individuals really love this industry and had A LOT to share!  Come back to the blog later this week for a recap of the Q & A.  Note: Another panel discussion is scheduled for tomorrow (Sun 10/17 12noon).

Below is the Q & A from opening night with Director, Darren Aronofsky

What Aronofsky’s Oscar nominated The Wrestler has in common with his latest film Black Swan is self destructive lead characters, and a lot of hand held, unfiltered camera shots; that’s where the similarities end, as The Wrestler was a true smaller Indie flick and Black Swan has the sweeping grandeur of an old-movie thriller.

There’s an ominousness surrounding the film from the start. Even as you are experiencing the innocence pouring out of  Nina (Natalie Portman) dressed in pristine whites shrugs and scarfs and baby pink coat, you feel there’s something else in store, you’re afraid of seeing something extremely disturbing.  The film explores a lot of themes: Perfection is an impossible state of being; We can be our own worse enemy: The opposite scales of black and white in terms of Nina being very controlled and Lilly (Mila Kunis) being uninhibited and full of  impulse. Mostly (sans the prince) it’s the story of the Swan Queen come to life in film.

Looks like Aronofsky will be back at the Oscars this coming March and Natalie Portman should be right beside him.

Q & A excerpts:

The impression you get of Darren Aronofsky is that he has to control his impulse to be a smart-ass. His biting wit reminds you of Sean Penn, if Penn draped himself in fringe scarfs. Kinda of hard to picture Aronofsky with Rachel Weisz who embodies such an Ivy League quality.  Of course, if she was looking to marry a super talented director, than she chose very well.

Q: Was the film Perfect Blue an inspiration for this film?

A: Not really, there are similarities between the films, but it wasn’t influenced by it. It really came out of Swan Lake the Ballet, we wanted to dramatize the ballet, that’s why it’s kind of up here and down there, because ballet is big and small in lots of ways.

Q: What was your favorite scene in the film?

A: I like the night of terror, when everything goes really crazy and her leg snaps back. It just makes me giggle at the end of it cause it’s just so f%*! up.

Q: Hi I’m Andrea and I was in The Wrestler.

A: Oh, Hey Andrea.

Q: I just want to say I thought it was awesome!

A: What, The Wrestler ? Or you in The Wrestler? (laughter)

Q: How long did Natalie Portman train for this role?

A: (addresses question to PA Ballet company in the audience) How did she do dancers, was she ok? (General sounds of approval) This is what I say about it, if you’re a lay person, you’ll believe it. If your a dancer you’ll give her credit for working f’ ing hard. I can see the problems, but she did a really good job. She had a year of training. It wasn’t supposed to be a year, but it was really hard to raise the money, so every time we pushed it back 3 months, she’d go back to existing on carrot sticks.

Q: Can you talk a little bit about the music in terms of the score by Clint Mansell?

A: One of the major reasons I did the film was for Clint, my composer, because I knew it was going to be a big challenge to take one of the great  masterpieces ever written by Tchaikovsky and to turn it into movie music.  Clint deconstructed the piece, because if you play the music over normal scenes it’s just too overwrought. So he basically took those melodies, themes and ideas stripped them down and added his own stuff. Then we went to London and recorded with an 80 piece orchestra, which was amazing. So the score kinda weaves in and out of  Clint’s manipulation of Tchaikovsky to real Tchaikovsky, rearranged so that darker tones come out. It was a pretty cool project.

Q: Regarding the hand held camera work.

A: Well I did that in The Wrestler, brought the camera into the ring. And I knew that’s what I had to do with the camera for this movie.  I wanted to dance with the dancers. I wanted to show the effort, the emotion. Very few people get to see that up close. I was lucky, I got to stand backstage at the Bolshoi and at The Met and see how hard it is.  I wanted to translate that to the audience. These dancers, they work their whole lives to make things look effortless. So when you see it you think, that’s no big deal.  But when you actually see it up close and see what their muscles are doing; the intense pain and pleasure mixed all in one, it’s an amazing thing.

Q: Why the fascination with toe nails and finger nails?

A: I don’t know. (laughter) I do know that one of the dancers gave me her toe nail at the end of the shoot.  It was really nasty. (jokingly) I think she thought it was charming, but she’ll never get another job from me. (turning back to Andrea) And maybe you won’t either Andrea.

Q: Regarding sex scene between Mila Kunis and Natalie Portman. How does the sensuality relate to her madness?

A: (slyly) Repeat the question.  Um.. let’s see.. well, it’s very much a coming of age story. A girl stuck in a woman’s body.  I think we see that a lot with boys becoming men, but rare to see it from a girl’s point of view; and of course a big part of that is sexuality.  And uh. . . so that’ what we explored and so… I’m blushing a little bit.

Q: What is your previous experience with ballet?

A: My sister was a ballet dancer when I was a kid. She danced all through high school and I would walk by and see the point shoes and never understood it. So when I first started making features I thought doing something in the ballet world would be interesting to explore….  Most of the time when you go to an industry and say – “Hey, I want to make a movie about you”, they open up the doors and you can go anywhere. The  ballet world was like “No thank you”. They really don’t care about movies, or much else outside of ballet. It’s a very intense and insular world. . . No one was interested in helping us out except The Pennslyvania Ballet and luckily they were on break, if they were in the middle of their season, forget about.

Q: Why the title Black Swan?

A: Next question.

Links

The Bulletin Board

> The Bulletin Board Blog
> Partner festivals calling now
> Call for Entry Channel
> Film Showcase
>
 The Best for Fests

Meet our Fest Partners 

Following News

Interview with AFM Director

 

Interview with Cannes Marche du Film Director 

 

Interview with the Parasite director

Brad Pitt and Leonard Maltin Interviewed

Filmfestivals.com dailies live coverage from


> Live from India
> Live from LA
> IFFI Goa
> Beyond Borders
> Lost World Film Festival
> Locarno
> Toronto
> Venice
> San Sebastian
> BFI London

> Film Festival Days
> AFM
> Tallinn Black Nights 
> Red Sea International Film Festival

> Palm Springs Film Festival
> Kustendorf
> Rotterdam
> Sundance
Santa Barbara Film Festival SBIFF
> Berlin 
> Fantasporto
Amdocs
Houston WorldFest 
Cannes / Marche du film online

Useful links for the indies:

Big files transfer
> Celebrities / Headlines / News / Gossip
> Clients References
> Crowd Funding
> Deals

> Festivals Trailers Park
> Film Commissions 
> Film Schools
> Financing
> Independent Filmmaking
> Motion Picture Companies and Studios
> Movie Sites
> Movie Theatre Programs
> Music/Soundtracks 
> Posters and Collectibles
> Professional Resources
> Screenwriting
> Search Engines
> Self Distribution
> Search sites – Entertainment
> Short film
> Streaming Solutions
> Submit to festivals
> Videos, DVDs
> Web Magazines and TV

A question for Jennifer Aniston from Richard Hobert winner at SBIFF 2020 :

> Other resources

+ SUBSCRIBE to the weekly Newsletter
+ Connecting film to fest: Marketing & Promotion
Special offers and discounts
Festival Waiver service
 

User images

gersbach.net