Pro Tools
•Register a festival or a film
Submit film to festivals Promote for free or with Promo Packages

FILMFESTIVALS | 24/7 world wide coverage

Welcome !

Enjoy the best of both worlds: Film & Festival News, exploring the best of the film festivals community.  

Launched in 1995, relentlessly connecting films to festivals, documenting and promoting festivals worldwide.

A brand new website will soon be available. Covid-19 is not helping, stay safe meanwhile.

For collaboration, editorial contributions, or publicity, please send us an email here

User login

|FRENCH VERSION|

RSS Feeds 

Martin Scorsese Masterclass in Cannes

 

Filmfestivals.com services and offers

 

Cannes


 

2021 Full coverage / Sample of newsletters 
2020 FULL coverage : FESTIVAL / MARKET 
2019 coverage : FESTIVAL / MARKET 
2018 coverage : FESTIVAL  / MARKET

ARCHIVES:  Video gallery I Image gallery I Conference Future of Cinema in Cannes I PROMOTE YOUR FILM I VIDEO SERVICES IN CANNES

Filmfestivals.com has become the number 1 online media on cannes with 1300 articles published for the 3 past editions. 10 newsletters reaching close to 2 M film professionals...


feed

In Competition: "Gomorrah" by Matteo Garrone

The film:

Organized crime casts its shadow on the day, with Gomorrah, adapted from Roberto Saviano's bestseller about the Camorra, competing in the official Selection. This audacious dive into the heart of the Neapolitan underworld is directed by Matteo Garrone, who was at the Cannes Festival in 2002 with The Embalmer, selected by the Quinzaine des Réalisateurs.

"The raw material I had to work with when shooting Gomorrah," Garrone remarked, "was so visually powerful that I merely filmed it in as straightforward a way as possible, as if I were the passerby who happened to find myself there by chance. I thought this was the most effective way of reproducing the feelings I experienced during the time I spent making the film."

The result is a true story within a story of the workings of the Naples crime families. A single rule, a single tool: violence. A single language: the gun. A single dream: power. A single fulfillment: blood. We look in on a few days in the life of those who dwell in a world devoid of mercy. As clan wars rage over various illicit business operations, Gomorrah traces the interlocking destinies of several characters trapped in the infernal web of the Camorra.

 

Press conference:

The whole crew of the film Gomorrah gathered in the conference room to field questions from the international press. Present with director Matteo Garrone and investigative journalist Roberto Saviano were actors Maria Nazionale, Toni Servillo, Salvatore Cantalupo, and Gianfelice Imparato, screenwriter Maurizio Braucci, and producer Domenico Procacci. Highlights follow:

Gomorrah


Matteo Garrone, on decisions about the film's form:
"To produce the kind of emotional impact that I experienced when I went there, I thought this was the right choice in terms of filming. I wanted the filming to be almost invisible. And the film also lends itself to this kind of language. Any comments or unnecessary camera work or framing didn't fit in with the film... War reports also influenced me and encouraged me to choose this kind of language, because you need to give the audience the feeling that they're actually there... So that people almost sensed the smells in those places."

Roberto Saviano, on seeing organized crime as a corporation:
"The day the Twin Towers collapsed, two Neapolitans call each other up and say, 'Oh, did you see? There's some land available in lower Manhattan.' What the rest of the world experienced as a tragedy, they saw as an investment opportunity. That gives you an idea of how dynamic this organization is."

Matteo Garrone, on the risks involved in shooting:
"The population was very available. They participated whole-heartedly, and they were the first spectators of the film. When we shot these scenes, they were always looking on, providing advice, and participating actively. Often, it's the cinema that helps to shape these people's taste, and not the opposite... Even if the film denounces a given "reality," it moves in a different direction. It's not designed to be a kind of an inquiry... I don't feel I'm in any danger... I think the film and the book are very complementary."

Gianfelice Imparato, on his part:
"I was very fortunate, because my character represented the fear of most people who find themselves in such a situation... Just to react to what Matteo said, I agree. My character had to be invisible. No one was supposed to see him. In fact, he was called the Submarine... I was able to apply the rule I use in theater, the rule of subtraction... I really had to feel this fear."

User images

gersbach.net