Pro Tools
•Register a festival or a film
Submit film to festivals Promote for free or with Promo Packages

FILMFESTIVALS | 24/7 world wide coverage

✨✨

Enjoy the best of both worlds: Portal with Film & Fest News and Social network for the festival community.  

Since 1995 we enjoy connecting films to festivals and document the world of festivals worldwide.
We offer the most comprehensive festival directory of 7 000 festivals, browse festival blogs, film blogs...and promote yourself.

The website is currently being redesigned, we will surprise you very soon.

User login

Animation Day in Cannes


The joint initiative from animaze and filmfestivals.com (launched in 2015)  stops this year to leave room for Annecy and Marche du Film and their NEW INITIATIVE ANIMATION DAY: May 19, 2019 

English Version I French Version 
WWW.ANIMATIONDAYINCANNES.COM  www.filmfestivals.com/blog/animation_day_in_cannes   #animationdayincannes       @animationdayinc       Facebook

 

Check the video channels and our history:  

 
 

feed

Animaze Daze in Cannes Selection Borrowed Time by Lou Hamou-Lhadj

 

A weathered Sheriff returns to the remains of an accident he has spent a lifetime trying to forget. With each step forward, the memories come flooding back. Faced with his mistake once again, he must find the strength to carry on.

Director Biography

Born in Peru of Colombian and Scottish parents, Andrew grew up around the world before settling in the US at the age of 16. Meanwhile, Lou's childhood took root in the culturally rich suburbs of exotic southern New Jersey. Despite their disparate upbringings, their shared passions for fine arts and film led both Andrew and Lou to study Film at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts. It was here that they first met, and learned they could combine those passions into the most rewarding of art forms: animation. Kindred spirits in their love for bringing things to life one frame at a time, they both worked on each other’s shorts during school, and vowed to someday make a film together when the time was right.

Lou enjoyed the next 8 years at Pixar as a Character Artist on WALL•E, Toy Story 3, Partly Cloudy, Day & Night, Brave, Toy Story That Time Forgot, and The Good Dinosaur. For the first 3 years, he and Andrew stayed in close contact while Andrew rose through the ranks at Blue Sky Studios, animating on Horton Hears a Who, Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs and finally serving as a Character Lead on Rio. Andrew then joined Pixar in 2010 where he has animated on Cars 2, Brave, Toy Story OF TERROR!, Inside Out and The Good Dinosaur.

Reuniting at Pixar rekindled the spark to create something together. During their spare time over the past 5 years they have been learning, growing, failing, picking each other up and ultimately crafting their directorial debut, BORROWED TIME.

 

  • Lou Hamou-Lhadj
    Director
    WALL·E, Partly Cloudy, Toy Story 3, Day & Night Brave, Toy Story That Time Forgot, The Good Dinosaur
  • Andrew Coats
    Director
    Horton Hears a Who, Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs, Rio, Cars 2, Brave, Toy Story of Terror, Inside Out, The Good Dinosaur
  • Andrew Coats
    Writer
    Horton Hears a Who!, Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs, Rio, Cars 2, Brave, Toy Story of Terror, Inside Out, The Good Dinosaur
  • Lou Hamou-Lhadj
    Writer
    WALL·E, Partly Cloudy, Toy Story 3, Day & Night Brave, Toy Story That Time Forgot, The Good Dinosaur
  • Mark C. Harris
    Writer
    No Time for Nuts, Horton Hears a Who!, Surviving Sid, Up, Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs, Doug's Special Mission, Brave, The Good Dinosaur
  • Amanda Deering Jones
    Producer
    Shark Tale, Over the Hedge, Flushed Away, How to Train Your Dragon, Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs, Surviving Sid, Monsters University
  • Film Type:
    Animation, Short
  • Genres:
    Western, Drama
  • Runtime:
    6 minutes 45 seconds
  • Completion Date:
    September 15, 2015
  • Country of Origin:
    United States
  • Country of Filming:
    United States
  • Aspect Ratio:
    16:9
  • Film Color:
    Color
  • First-time Filmmaker:
    No
  • Student Project:
    No

Director Statement

In America, animation has largely become synonymous with “kids’ films,” whereas elsewhere around the world it is celebrated as a medium that can be used to tell any story. We feel this cultural difference limits the potential audience and range of themes in American animation, and is a large part of why we chose to make Borrowed Time.

Having worked on family films with a lot of heart and comedy, we wanted to do something outside of our comfort zone: a serious, action drama. We knew this would be a huge challenge for us. In order for the audience to truly connect and care about our characters in 6 minutes, we would need to steer away from the outlandish or oversimplified. We wanted to create an experience that is grounded and relatable. This was the vision that drove the look, animation style and story of Borrowed Time.

As first time directors, there was much to learn over the course of this production. We began with naïve optimism, thinking we could handle much of the work ourselves. We poured over it through nights and weekends: writing, storyboarding, designing, modeling, rigging, and animating most of the film on our own. But 2+ years later, and with limited knowledge of the rest of the pipeline, the enormity of the remaining work began to seep in. It was serendipitous, however, that our passion and resolve to finish garnered the attention of those around us. All of a sudden our friends and colleagues were offering to help after hours, many of whom quickly came to have an equal measure of pride in what was being accomplished. There was never a day when we could simply “direct,” but having the opportunity to form this small community of artists who push each other was one of the most rewarding experiences of our lives. We’re beyond grateful to all of our friends without whose passion and dedication Borrowed Time would not exist.

 

User images

About Animation Day in Cannes

gersbach.net